Beauty Tips for Girls Coming to Espana

So it’s been awhile, am I right? I’m much better at instagramming pictures than I am blogging. Anyways, today I was thinking about all the beauty struggles I’ve gone through in Spain and I wanted to write a post for future auxiliares or girls living in Spain with some tips. Some of the tips might seem obvious to people who have been living in Spain, but I mean, just the fact that Spain doesn’t have Walgreens or CVS’s that are open 24 hours a day was enough to throw me for a loop in the beginning. So here was go:

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1. Shampoo/conditioner/normal products can be found at your local grocery store. Check there for things before going to Corte Ingles or a beauty specific store (perfumerias) because it’s cheaper.

2. Buy your hair dye in the USA and bring it over. The hair dyes over here are different. For example, I love Garnier hair dye products, but in Spain they have a different line of products that aren’t semi-permanent and are just completely different.

3. Don’t get blonde highlights over here. They don’t understand toning. I had yellow hair when I got my hair highlighted here because they didn’t tone it. Thankfully, I met an American girl who does hair over here, so she’s been doing my hair and understands how to do natural blonde highlights, not yellow brassy ones.

4. If you can’t find it, go to Corte Ingles or Sephora. 

5. You are going to have to try new brands. I love Jergans natural glow lotion, but they don’t carry it here. So, I just decided to try a different brand and it was fine.

6. Pay attention during tv commercials and read spanish beauty magazines. Just watching tv and seeing commercials, I learn about products. Off the topic of beauty, I’ve been DYING for greek yogurt similar to Chobani. I was watching TV the other day and there was a commercial for yogurt with 2x the protein in different flavors called Dani (made by Danon), but I was like YES FINALLY THE AMERICAN VERSION OF GREEK YOGURT. Next thing I knew, I was in Eroski and there it was! Don’t make the rookie mistake of thinking “Griego” yogurt is American greek yogurt, because it definitely is not. It’s gross and runny and pretty bad for you.

7. Bring powder deodorant and dry shampoo from the USA. Also, the only face wash choice I have over here is Clean & Clear, and there’s barely a selection. I haven’t seen Neutrogena or Cetaphil products (my go to at home) anywhere, so if you are really particular about your face products, I suggest bringing them from the USA. 

8. Buy a straightener over here. When I first came over and was backpacking, I remember being super excited to be in Ireland and was getting ready to go out for the first night in Europe, so I needed to straighten my hair. Well, I plugged it in (with a plug adaptor) and started straightening my hair. Next thing I know, there is black smoke and it smells like my hair is burning. Thankfully, it was just the straightener and I didn’t end up like this girl…

But my wand does work over here! I use a plug adaptor with it, but for some reason it does. The brand is hot tools.

9. Primark and Chinos can have great beauty tools. I got some great eye shadow brushes, loofa and nail stuff from Primark and it’s super cheap. But I mean, you can’t buy foundation or mascara there and expect a good result.

10. Take advantage of the cheap waxing here. A brazilian wax is 14 euros. Enough said. 

Hope this helps for any chicas coming to Spain soon! :) Ask me if you have any other questions. I didn’t want to write too long of a post, but I could probably write 4x as much as a did here about beauty in Spain!

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10 Things All New Auxiliares Should Know

I remember last year at this time when I was thinking about doing the Auxiliar de Conversacion program in Spain. I had about a million questions running through my head, and I felt like every blog post I read or facebook group post I read was giving me some solid answers, but also some mixed answers on a few different topics. So, I decided to write this for new auxiliares about the top 10 things I think they should know BEFORE coming into the program.

1. It’s in Spain. I know this is obvious, but with the program being in Spain means that it operates under a spanish timeline. What I mean is that everything takes a little longer here. Everything from a visit to a restaurant to getting your NIE card. With that being said, you also won’t find out about your school placement for awhile, and even after you do, you probably won’t get too much information until the first day you walk into the school. Also, basically the whole month of August, Spain is on vacation, so don’t expect any emails regarding your school to be returned then. Unless you get a school director that’s super into technology and communication, which is rare. But remember the positive too–it’s in Spain! Siestas, vino, parties, different culture, travel, etc. 

Spain in a nutshell. (source)

Spain in a nutshell. (source)

2. It’s run by the Spanish Government. Be prepared for bureaucracy at is finest. It took me FOREVER to get my NIE/TIE because I live in Bizkaia but my school is in Gipuzkoa, so I had to go to San Sebastian police station to get my NIE (just the number), but then had to get my TIE (the actual card) from the Bilbao police station. Why? Not really sure. It really depends on who is working what day and your luck. But in my experience, put a smile on your face and attempt to speak spanish and (most) people will be helpful.

3. Brush up on Spanish BEFORE you come. Listen to music, study general vocab and verbs, etc. Check out my post about learning spanish if you need some ideas!

Don't be this person when you come. (source)

Don’t be this person when you come. (source)

4. Find housing AFTER you come. Don’t agree to anything before you come. It’s better to book a hostel or hotel for a week and figure out where you want to live once you get a feeling of the city or pueblo you’re living in.

5. Come with money. There have been lots of posts in the auxiliares facebook page and the general consensus is come with about $2000-$2500 saved. I came with that much and it really helped me when I needed to quit aupairing and live on my own.

6. Settle first, travel later. Yes, you’re living in Europe and it’s really exciting that you can travel everywhere so easily. But if I could go back and change something, I wouldn’t have traveled so much in the beginning here. It was overwhelming and I feel like now I have a good group of friends who have become my travel buddies and I enjoy the trips I take more. I think trying to settle and getting to know the city you’re living in first is really important. I didn’t feel settled here until late December, then I went to the USA for Xmas and it took me another money after I got home to resettle.

Me, when I got here lolol. I'm still like this. #wanderlustproblems (source)

Me, when I got here lolol. I’m still like this. #wanderlustproblems (source)

7. Use social media and word of mouth for private classes. I got the majority of my classes using the facebook groups. People always post about people wanting private lessons, and once you find a family or two, it usually just snowballs to more people wanting them. Be open to teaching both children and adults. I give a lot of lessons to adults and they are my favorite classes!

8. Bring an unlocked iPhone (or other phone that is unlocked). Seriously. This is one thing I STRUGGLED with when I got here. I don’t like to be that person that is attached to their phone, but when you move to a foreign country and are trying to settle, technology is VITAL. You need it to schedule private classes, for apartment searching, maps if you get lost. I didn’t have a working iPhone here until the middle of November (about 7 weeks after I got here) and it was just awful. If you have an unlocked iPhone, all you have to do is get a sim card and pop it in! It’s so easy. I use Yoigo and I love it. It ends up being about 10 euros a month and I have 3G and cheap texting/calling. In Spain, everyone uses Whatsapp, so text message prices never factor in anyways. And I only call for emergencies. I can recharge my sim card online and I do it every 2 months. So just bring an unlocked phone and save yourself the hassle of getting it unlocked here, or worse, having to buy a phone here. 

9. Not everything is going to work out–be flexible. When I first got here, I was a live in aupair. It was awful. It seemed like it was going to be the perfect situation because I would have free rent/food and only had to watch the kids a few hours a day. Well, a few hours turned into a lot of hours and I was overwhelmed and felt like I had no life here. After a month, I quit aupairing, moved out, find an apartment and began giving private classes. Just remember to be flexible and if something doesn’t work out, change it. 

Always true! No matter the situation. (source)

Always true! No matter the situation. (source)

10. Just breath! It’ll be fine! It’s going to be overwhelming at times, but it’s an adventure and a HUGE learning experience. The best part is, you’re in Spain, so everything is more laid back here. In the USA, I felt like my life NEVER slowed down and I was always going and stressed. Here, while I was really overwhelmed when I first got here, I did have time to relax and breath once I quit aupairing. So relax, half the struggle is making the decision to come and the first 1-2 months of living here. But like any big change in life, it takes time. You’re not going to feel settled and comfortable over night, but give it time. I really think it’s about making it over that 2 month mark, and then it’s pretty smooth sailing. 

Just go! (source)

Just go! (source)

I hope this helps any auxiliares who are thinking about doing the program! I would highly recommend it. And if you hate it, the time FLIES. I am in month 7 or my 8 month contract, and it seems like I just got here YESTERDAY. Let me know if you have any other questions, I’d be happy to answer them!

 

Vegan Brownie Batter in a Mug

LO SIENTO for the blog disappearance, but a few weeks ago was CARNIVAL (or, CARNAVAL en espanol) in Spain and I jetted off to Tenerife in the Canary Islands for the week and I’ve been SO BUSY since then figuring out future plans, planning trips, working, etc. Tenerife is definitely one of the coolest places I’ve ever been in the world. There’s not too many places in the world that have snow, volcanoes, volcanic rock, mountains, beaches, cliffs and the ocean all within 1 hour driving distance of each other. Check out my Instagram for pictures from the trip!

You know it's a successful trip when you get a new profile picture for Facebook....

You know it’s a successful trip when you get a new profile picture for Facebook….lol

Onto something equally as important as traveling–chocolate. Do you ever get chocolate cravings? Some nights, I just CRAVE chocolate and I finally found cocoa powder in Bilbao, so I’ve been experimenting a lot with it. I have a recipe that I HAVE TO SHARE BECAUSE IT’S THAT GOOD. I’ve told a few of my chicas en espana about it, but I wanted to share it on here too! It’s ooey gooey chocolatey sweet goodness in a mug. And who doesn’t like eating things out of cute mugs? When I was little, I remember always eating ice cream out of mugs with my dad at night. Since then, eating things out of mugs has always made stuff taste better to me.

Vegan Brownie Batter in a Mug

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Ingredients: 1/4 c instant oats, 2 tablespoons cocoa powder, 2 teaspoons honey, 1/2 banana, 1-2 tsp peanut butter or nutella (optional, but I HIGHLY recommend)

Prep time: 5 minutes | Ready in: 5 minutes

Directions:
Put ingredients in mug in this order: oats, cocoa powder and then honey. Break or slice the banana into smaller pieces and place on top of oats, cocoa powder and honey. DON’T MIX ANYTHING YET. Place in microwave on high for 20 seconds. The honey should be boiling and the banana should be softer when you take it out (if it’s not, microwave a little more). AFTER microwaved, mash and mix ingredients in the mug. Place in microwave for an additional 20 seconds on high.

Nutrition: whole serving contains (without peanut butter)
197 kCal | 2.7g fat | 44.7g carbohydrates | 7.1g dietary fiber | 5.3g protein
*with 2 tsp peanut butter, add around 63 kCal, 5.4g fat, 2.1g carbohydrates, 0.6g dietary fiber and 2.7g protein

This seriously tastes like brownie batter, but it’s healthy and doesn’t have any raw egg, butter, oil, flour, is gluten-free (depending on if you consider oats vegan free–I do), vegan, under 200 calories AND hits the chocolate cravings. What more can you ask for? 

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What’s your favorite food to hit chocolate cravings? Have you every visited the Canary Islands in Spain?

How To Battle Homesickness Abroad

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Hi lovies!

Happy Friday! I’m currently on my way to Salamanca for the weekend, but I wanted to share this blog post (side note: follow my Instagram or Twitter (both @wanderlustkait) for updates during my Salamanca trip! I always post pictures while I’m traveling!). So I wrote a post a few months ago about The Spain Struggle and cultural adaptation, so this is kind of Part II in the series. Now that I’ve had my fair share of culture adaptation and homesickness, I think I’ve finally figured out the key to beating it. I’m going to be completely honest when I say coming back to Spain after spending the holidays in the USA was harder than the first time I left. The travel itself was easier because I knew what to expect when I got here, but leaving my family, friends and Ohio was just a lot harder the second time around. Now I’ve been back for about a month and a half and while it might be that I have readjusted to the culture, I think there is one thing I’m doing a lot different than when I arrived in Spain in September that is making all the difference.

Instead of missing things about home, I am making Bilbao my home.

It’s as simple as that. Instead of missing everything about the USA, I am embracing more things about Spain. I also am beginning to realize that a lot of the things I was missing, I just needed to look a little harder for. For example, my little sister, Emily. It turns out she was living a few pisos down and I just wasn’t looking hard enough. JUST KIDDING. But little things like peanut butter, a yoga mat, a cafe that has to-go soy lattes, indulging in watching #TheBachelor, etc (so many #whitegirlproblems necessities). So if you’re abroad, lonely, homesick and reading this, here’s some simple instructions to get you started. First, leave you house. Go out and get something that reminds you of home. Anything. A book, music, a coffee, a candle, a food. Second, start building your own home in your current city. For me, investing in things that make me feel more at home, are actually turning Bilbao into more of a home for me. And lately, despite all the rain, Bilbao has been growing on me (I can’t believe I just said that!).

I think it’s important for people to remember that when you move abroad, you don’t have to lose yourself. I know all those pinterest quotes are like “LEAVE YOUR IDENTITY BEHIND AND JUST LOSE YOURSELF IN THE TREES AND GRASS OF EVERY CONTINENT AND BECOME ONE WITH THE WIND AND NEVER LOOK BACK” or something, but in all honestly, I think that’s far from the truth (And yes, I’ve probably pinned every single one of those quotes, in case you were wondering). I think the key to battling homesickness is bringing elements of home to you. And I’ve found, the more home I bring to me, the less I feel like I need it, and the more I can truly embrace living in Spain. 

**Note: A close second for the key to battling homesickness was giving someone a hug. Not even kidding. Hug it out. It helps. 

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Have you ever been homesick while being abroad (or just away from home)? What do you think helps battle homesickness the most?